Boom Technology Inc. is a Denver based company developing supersonic passenger airplanes. Their product is named ‘Overture’, and is designed to reach speeds of Mach 1.7. Today’s newsbreak is that United has signed an aircraft purchase agreement for 15 of Boom’s ‘Overture’ airliners. The Overture airliners are net-zero carbon aircrafts that are slated to carry passengers in 2029. United’s new Overture fleet promises to be twice as fast as today’s aircrafts. If the claims are true, here are some flight durations on United routes, as shared by Boom;

  • EWR – LHR: 3.30 hrs, instead of the 6.30hrs it takes today
  • EWR – FRA: 4.0 hrs, instead of the 7.0 hrs it takes today
  • SFO – NRT: 6.0 hrs, instead of the 10.15hrs it takes today

Boom’s announcement of the United agreement

United Airlines CEO, Scott Kirby shared the following;

United continues on its trajectory to build a more innovative, sustainable airline and today’s advancements in technology are making it more viable for that to include supersonic planes. Boom’s vision for the future of commercial aviation, combined with the industry’s most robust route network in the world, will give business and leisure travelers access to a stellar flight experience. Our mission has always been about connecting people and now working with Boom, we’ll be able to do that on an even greater scale.

Boom Overture Experience

United Boom

Conceptual Render – Boom Overture

The Overture aircraft can cruise at 60,000 feet, with 65-88 passengers onboard, a range of 4888 miles while reaching Mach 1.7 speed. The conceptual render of the onboard experience indicates a business class (First maybe?) like setup with ample personal space and privacy. What the United aircrafts end up with, could be vastly different. I am imagining a Polaris style seating instead of the one displayed in the render.

United going Supersonic in 2029?

United’s signed deal includes 15 Boom Overture aircrafts (apparently ‘aircrafts’ is not a word, the outrage!) to begin with, with an option for 35 more once the aircrafts meet the safety and operating standards. While extremely exciting, there is obviously a lot more that will be needed to make this a reality – operating costs, passenger confidence, 2029 timeline, environmental impacts, government approvals, are just some of the challenges that lay ahead. There is no doubt that the future will include some levels of supersonic travel, but I am personally not buying the 2029 timeline, just yet.